As a child my curiosity intrigued adults. I dared to ask probing questions. I hope to tell stories through design that can both promote change and offer reassurance.

On Making

On Making

All the recent talk on design thinking should not undermine the importance of making. If you can think and think and write and think some more than then I do suggest you reevaluate your career path. Because as much as the point of contact of your fingers on a keyboard or pencil on a paper that brings your idea into form can be dreaded, it sure is indispensable.

Different schools approach making in different ways, some emphasize the design process while others focus on the quality of the final product. All design students are familiar with projects they have no idea how to tackle. Cluelessly sitting in front of our laptop, we know what we want to achieve but can’t seem to know how to execute it. And less so, where to start. The fluency comes with experience and time. It will take a while before we are handed a brief and immediately have clear vision of how to execute the design from a to z.

Our professors are always insisting on the importance of being able to justify the decisions we make in design: "More think, less ink". This is valuable advice but there is no code, system or method that works for everybody. As much as we’d like our process to be uniform and predictable it never is and especially as young designers, it essentially comes down to trial and error.

Over the course of my education it’s been challenging for me to budget how much time a project will take because I’m constantly running into new obstacles and decisions. Sometimes I’ll work on a project for a couple hours and realize it worked better before I made any edits. Be open-minded and don’t make your work your baby. Understand and acknowledge that your work is not finite or static. It is always evolving and never finished. It may be that your client wants to change materials or format and you’ll have to adapt to that. Although it’s important to defend the direction that you believe in the beauty of design lies in its versatility and flexibility. Times change, needs change, technologies evolve, people’s behavior are subject to change too and it’s up to a designer to embrace these changes rather than reject them.

On Discovered Values

On Discovered Values

On Where I Stand

On Where I Stand