As a child my curiosity intrigued adults. I dared to ask probing questions. I hope to tell stories through design that can both promote change and offer reassurance.

On Design and Me

On Design and Me

It was made clear rather soon, in the eyes of my parents and my own, that I would not become a scientist or an economist but pursue a creative career. I took art classes my whole life, at which I wasn't bad. I wanted to be a maker, a creator of content, but didn’t see myself as an artist. When I visited art schools, like RISD and Pratt, although it seemed like an exhilarating place to be, I didn’t see myself there. I thought it would get tiresome to be solely surrounded by people who are doing exactly the same thing as me. I also liked the idea of a campus where I would bump into engineers, anthropology majors, and business majors as well as design students. It makes for better people watching.

I happily enrolled in the school of art and design at Northeastern and spent my first semester abroad in Costa Rica. When I received my class schedule for my first semester on the Boston campus, I began to doubt my decision. Drawing I, Color Basics… “How is graphic design here in college any different from what I did in high school art class?” I thought. It felt restrictive and lacked substance so I became Undeclared, giving myself some room to explore my options. Upon my arrival in Boston I dipped my toes in different territories, taking psych classes, as well as communications and design classes. I enjoyed taking classes in a variety of disciplines but none of them caused quite a stir like the art and design classes did. So within a couple of months I changed my major to revert it right back to what it was: graphic design.

Although I was presented with the fait accompli of being a graphic design major, the term graphic design was still fairly unclear in my mind. The main object associated with the field was a computer, which painfully reminded me I wasn’t very good “at computers”. The sad truth being that I still only type with four fingers… The first three semesters of my degree were dedicated to foundation, introductory courses. There were few mentions of computers or graphic design, and I got reacquainted with figure drawing and stained my dorm furniture with oil paints. 

Regardless of how enjoyable these classes were, I was eager to get started with the real stuff. The lack of exposure I had to the fundamentals of graphic design in my first two years at Northeastern created a void of meaning. I longed to be able to explain what it was I was studying and show some work that was not art, but design. Typography I was the first class that marked a pivotal point in my studies, I began to see it and feel it. This is what graphic design was! It felt like finally having human contact with someone you’ve seen on social media dozens of times.

On Connecting the Dots

On Connecting the Dots